You don’t have to know everything – just know the basics for the moment to be productive

In a lot of technological things, like driving a car, using a computer, using a cellphone, or using a calculator, you don’t have to know everything to be able to use them functionally and productively.  You just have to know the basics, at least initially, to be able to use these technologies or gadgets functionally and productively, such as to be able to drive a car to your destination; to use a computer to create a digital file; to use a cellphone to communicate with other people; and to use a calculator to add and subtract.   “At least initially” connotes that as you go on using the technologies or gadgets, you learn new things or refine things that you have learned before, either automatically or forced by circumstances.

Examples, in using a car, as you keep on driving it, you learn other functions that you did not know before but you are able to drive to your destination despite this.  Along the way, you learn troubleshooting; you learn how to use the warning signals; you learn or refine your skills on driving on an inclined road; etc.

In using a computer, initially you know the basics on how to create a document using your traditional know-how of a mechanical typewriter.  As you keep on using the word processing application, you learn new functions and shortcuts and you become more efficient in creating a digital document.  Also, as you keep on using the computer and other applications, you learn how to create other functions such as creation of slides, Excel, webpages, etc.’

In using a cellphone, initially you know the basics on how to communicate with other people using voice call.  Eventually, as you keep on using it, you learn how to text, you learn how to use the camera, the calculator, etc.

In using a calculator, initially you know the basic functions of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.  As you keep on using the calculator, you learn how to use the other built-in functional buttons.

Specific personal example: I don’t use the calculator often.  I just know the basics of arithmetic.  I don’t use the other built-in functional buttons.  If I type in a wrong entry, I would usually press on both “CA” and “C” buttons and start the arithmetic calculation all over again. Today, May 22, 2019, I decided to study the difference between the “CA” and “C” buttons.  I searched the Internet and I tried what I learned.  For correction of wrong entries, I just have to press the “C” button (I think “C” stands for “Clear”). If I want to clear everything, I press the “CA” button (I think “CA” stands for “Clear All”)  This is one refinement that I learned today and which I am going to use from now on.  I will explore the usage of the other functional buttons in the future if needed like MU and RV.  For the moment, this is enough for me for the moment based on current needs, I can productively use the calculator using the basic arithmetic processes and the “CA” and “C” buttons.   Note: I don’t know what “ON” and “CI” stand for.  I searched the Internet and I could not find the answer.  I suppose “CI” stands for “Clear Input.”

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Summary:

In a lot of technological things, like driving a car, using a computer, using a cellphone, or using a calculator, you don’t have to know everything to be able to use them functionally and productively.  You just have to know the basics, at least initially.

Related reflection:

In almost everything in life (how to live life), you won’t be able to know everything and there are so many ways of doing things.  To be initially functional and productive, at least know the basics – the principles and elemental skills.   As you go on, maintain but refine the basics – the principles and elemental skills – and continue to add more learning as indicated, based on your needs and contentment requirement.


ROJ@19may22 

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