Report on the Use of ROJoson’s Rain-Flood-Wind Situation Monitoring and Risk Assessment and Action / Decision Checklist and Evaluation (June 13, 2013)

Report on the Use of ROJoson’s Rain-Flood-Wind Situation Monitoring and Risk Assessment and Action / Decision Checklist and Evaluation (June 13, 2013)

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Report on the Use of  ROJoson’s Rain-Flood-Wind Situation Monitoring and Risk Assessment and Action / Decision Checklist and Evaluation (June 13, 2013)

On June 13, 2013, I encountered a Rain-Flood Situation.  In the morning before I left my residence, I looked at the sky (it was bright).  It was not raining.  I looked at the PAGASA and MMDA advisories (for the former, cloudy with rainshowers or thunderstorms and for the latter, no warning for floods).  I went to ManilaDoctorsHospital to see patients and attend a Mancom meeting.  During the meeting, I heard sounds outside the room that indicated that it was raining.  After our meeting at 430 pm, I looked outside and saw the perimeter floods in front (UN Avenue) and back (Kalaw St).  I looked at the advisories of PAGASA and MMDA through their websites and tweets.  I called up my contact person in Vito Cruz to check the road situation as this is usually my path of travel going home.  After getting the needed info, I made a travel risk assessment.  It was high-risk to travel.  I decided to stay put.   I called up my wife to tell her of my whereabout and plan.  I called up my son who was in UP Manila and advised him on what to do – stay put and go to his cousin’s condo unit in Robinsons and wait.  I constantly monitored the status of the rain, flood and also the traffic through the online sites of PAGASA and MMDA and my contact person in Vito Cruz.  I also updated my wife on my whereabout and plan.  At 10 pm, with the flood completely subsiding and reported light traffic from MMDA in my path of travel, I decided to go home and advised my son to do the same.  At 1045, my son and I reached safely home.  With this incident in June 13, 2013, I was able to use the checklist that I formulated in June 12, 2013 (see below).  I was also able to evaluate its usefulness and practicality.

Rain-Flood-Wind Situation Monitoring and Risk Assessment and Action / Decision Checklist and Evaluation.

Steps

Recommendations

Action / Decision

Consequence, if any

Monitoring for RFW situation
Personal evaluation Looking outside of residence or workplace (raining / will rain – clue in sky) Done / not done
PAGASA Advisories http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.phhttps://twitter.com/DOST_PAGASA Done / not done
MMDA Advisories http://www.mmda.gov.phhttps://twitter.com/MMDA Done / not done
Contact persons in areas of concerns Residence – persons / contact nos.Path of Travel – persons / contact nos.

Workplace – persons / contact nos.

Done / not done
RFW Risk Assessment*

Low

May travel Travel / No travel

Moderate

As much as possible stay put Travel / No travel

High

Stay put Travel / No travel Safe at place where I stayed put and safe travel home from 10pm to 1045pm.

Experiential Learnings:

  1. It is not only the rain-flood-wind that we have to monitor and contend with.  The traffic caused by the RFW is another potential negative consequence.
  2. I discovered two tools to monitor the traffic situation –http://mmdatraffic.interaksyon.com and http://www.waze.com(http://www.waze.com/download/iphone)
  3. I have to be complete and vigilant in the needed paraphernalia for RFW.  In particular, I need to acquire a part of rubber boots.

Paraphernalia

Status

PAGASA advisories

MMDA advisories

Contact Persons in areas of concerns advisories

Cellphone (charged) – bring charger whenever traveling during RFW situation

Contact numbers of all parties needed to communicate with (see above)

Umbrella

Raincoat

Jacket

Towel and extra clothing

Rubber boots

have to acquire soon for my son and me

Stick / rod
Emergency money

Flashlight

√√

Matches / candles

Whistle

Car in good running condition

Flood exits

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