Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan – August 7, 2012

Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan – August 7, 2012

Posted on August 7, 2012

 

Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

(Typhoon Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan)

 Policies and Procedures

August 7, 2012

Policies and Purpose:

 

The use of the term “rain-flood-wind” instead of “typhoon”

Traditionally, the typhoon or storm signal is used as an indicator for preparedness and justification for suspension of works and classes, etc., usually signal 2 and higher. Thus, the term typhoon disaster preparedness and response plan is commonly used and is activated for typhoon or storm signal 2 and higher.

Recent experience has shown that a disaster can occur even without the weather disturbance reaching the magnitude of a typhoon.  Thus, the term “rain-flood-wind” is being used in lieu of “typhoon.”

It is the policy of the hospital to have a rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan (or what it commonly called typhoon disaster preparedness and response plan) as part of its safety promotion and disaster preparedness program.

Weather disturbance in the form of low depression areas, monsoon rains, typhoons or storms is a frequent occurrence in the Philippines.  The country has an average of 20 typhoons or storms per year.

The rain-flood-wind associated with weather disturbance has the potential of causing damage to hospital infrastructure, injuries to staff and clients, and disruption of services.  A comprehensive and vigilant rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan must be in place in order to minimize, if not prevent, the ill-effects of the hazards on the hospital.

Responsibilities:

The rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan is under the supervision of the hospital Safety Promotion and Disaster Preparedness Committee.  Although it is collaborated by all units, the lead units shall be the Nursing Department and the Facilities Management Department.

All staff of hospital shall adhere to the policies and procedures on the rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan.

All staff of hospital are authorized to monitor adherence and to report non-adherence to the policies and procedures on the rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan.

Scope:

These policies and procedures on rain-flood-wind emergency preparedness and response plan apply to weather disturbance emergencies that involve only and within the premises of the hospital.

Operational Definitions of Terms:

Typhoon – A weather phenomenon in the Eastern Pacific that is precisely equivalent to a hurricane, which results in wind speeds of 118km/h or above. Equivalent to a cyclone in the Indian Ocean and Indonesia/Australia.    It is characterized by strong wind and/or rain.

Flooding – Submersion of the streets around the perimeter of the hospital thereby hampering access and exit to and from the hospital regardless of kinds of transportation.

PAGASA Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, a Philippine government agency responsible for weather forecasting, flood control, astronomical observations, and time service.

 

Procedures:

1.      When to activate the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan.

When PAGASA declares a Signal No.2 or higher in Metro Manila.

When there is flood in the perimeter of the hospital that prevents access and exit.

When there is a strong wind that causes destruction to hospital infrastructure and facilities.

A code such as CODE WATER may be used to refer to the activation of the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan.

 

2.    Who can activate the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan?

The security guards posted at the entrances and exits of the hospital monitor the presence of flood and its level during a weather disturbance. They can recommend activation of Code Water to the Nurse-supervisor-on-duty who shall decide on whether to activate it or not.  The nurse-supervisor-on-duty will as much as possible get an approval for the activation of Code Water from a higher level of authority, if not the Hospital Director.

 

 

3.      What are the main things to prepare when the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness Plan is activated.

Prepare for possible flooding within the hospital.

Check pumps for draining water.

Check drainage to ensure no clogging.

Prepare for possible damage to hospital infrastructures as a result of strong winds.

Check structures on the roof to ensure no flying objects when there is a strong wind.

Check ceiling for possible damage when there is a strong wind entering it.

Prepare for possible damage to hospital infrastructures as a result of strong rains.

Check for possible leak from the roof and on the side of the buildings.

Prepare for possible brown-outs or power failure.

Ensure functionality of the generators.

Ensure adequate supply of functional flashlights.

Prepare radios for communication within the hospital.

Prepare for possible water shortage.

Prepare for possible manpower shortage.

Prepare for a scheme to ensure adequate manpower during the typhoon.

Prepare for an overtime scheme for staff before, during, and after the typhoon.

Prepare for possible manpower being stranded in the hospital.

           Prepare for food for the staff who may be stranded in the hospital.

Prepare for lodging for the staff who may be stranded in the hospital.

 

4.      What are the main things to do when the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Response Plan is activated.

Watch for, respond and report damages / floods / injuries to persons.

Respond to brown-outs / water shortage / manpower shortage / stranded manpower with the objective of minimizing damage to hospital infrastructure, injuries to staff and clients, and disruption of services.

Other disaster preparedness and response plans may be activated as indicated such as the fire preparedness and response plan and sudden influx of patient response plan.

 

5.  What are the quality goals and objectives of a Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Response Plan?

Presence of a multisectoral team – monitoring rain-flood-wind (RFW) safety and supervise RFW response plan.

 

Nursing Service Department

Human Resources Division

Security Services

Facilities Management Division

Dietary Department

Linen and Housekeeping Services

With the formation of an incident command (incident commander, operations officer, communication officer, and runners)

The Nurse-supervisor on duty will serve as the initial incident commander.

He / she forms the multisectoral team with persons-in-charge of the following common areas of concerns during a rain-flood-wind emergency:

  • Security
  • Facility
  • Patient Care and Other Services
  • Staffing (MD, Nursing, and Other staff)
  • Nutrition of Staff
  • Housing and Housekeeping
  • Corporate Communication

No destruction of buildings, equipments, and supplies secondary to rains, floods and winds.

No interruption in power and water supply that will hamper hospital services and will cause other kinds of emergencies / disasters / crisis.

No hampering of services in hospital.

All services, particularly, critical services, are intact for whatever reasons.

Avoid lack of power and water supply that will hamper services.

Avoid lack of staff to serve patients.

Maintain the business of the hospital by promoting patient access to the hospital, such as giving info on status of the hospital during RFW-EDC.

No injury to

Staff on duty in the hospital

Staff reporting for duty to the hospital

Staff going off duty from the hospital

Maintenance of occupational health safety of staff.

Provide safe access to hospital staff and patients.

Info on

Status of the hospital during the RFW-EDC.

Accessibility to hospital.

Needs for more staff to report for duty in the hospital.

Provide transport to staff and patients to and fro the hospital when needed.

 

5.  Specific implementing procedural guidelines for the above general policies and procedures should be formulated based on the context of the hospital.

 

Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

A Checklist

Things to do Checkbox
Activate  Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan when PAGASA declares a Signal No. 2 or higher in Metro Manila.
Activate  Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan when there is flood in the perimeter of the hospital that prevents access and exit.
Activate  Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan when there is strong wind that causes destruction to hospital infrastructure and facilities.
When the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Response Plan is activated.
Prepare for possible flooding within the hospital.

  • Check pumps for draining water to prevent flooding.
  • Check drainage to ensure no clogging.
Prepare for possible damage to hospital infrastructures as a result of strong winds.

  • Check structures on the roof to ensure no flying objects when there is a strong wind.
  • Check ceiling for possible damage when there is a strong wind entering it.
Prepare for possible damage to hospital infrastructures as a result of strong rains.

  • Check for possible leak from the roof and on the side of the buildings.
Prepare for possible brown-outs or power failure.

  • Ensure functionality of the generators.
  • Ensure adequate supply of functional flashlights.
  • Prepare radios for communication within the hospital.
Prepare for possible water shortage.
Prepare for possible manpower shortage.

  • Prepare for a scheme to ensure adequate manpower during the typhoon.
  • Prepare for an overtime scheme for staff before, during, and after the typhoon.
Prepare for possible manpower being stranded in the hospital.

  • Prepare for food for the staff who may be stranded in the hospital.
  • Prepare for lodging for the staff who may be stranded in the hospital.
When the Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Response Plan is activated.
Watch for, respond and report damages / floods / injuries to persons.
Respond to brown-outs / water shortage / manpower shortage / stranded manpower with the objective of minimizing damage to hospital infrastructure, injuries to staff and clients, and disruption of services.
Activate other disaster preparedness and response plans as indicated such as the fire preparedness and response plan and sudden influx of patient response plan.
Quality goals and objectives of a Hospital Rain-Flood-Wind Emergency Response Plan
Presence of a multisectoral team – monitoring rain-flood-wind (RFW) safety and supervise RFW response plan.
No destruction of buildings, equipments, and supplies secondary to rains, floods and winds.
No interruption in power and water supply that will hamper hospital services and will cause other kinds of emergencies / disasters / crisis.
No hampering of services in hospital.
All services, particularly, critical services, are intact for whatever reasons.
Avoid lack of power and water supply that will hamper services.
Avoid lack of staff to serve patients.
Maintain the business of the hospital by promoting patient access to the hospital, such as giving info on status of the hospital during RFW-EDC.
No injury to staff on duty in the hospital.
No injury to staff reporting for duty to the hospital.
No injury to Staff going off duty from the hospital.
Maintenance of occupational health safety of staff.
Provide safe access to hospital staff and patients.
Info on status of the hospital during the RFW-EDC.
Info on accessibility to hospital.
Info on  neds for more staff to report for duty in the hospital.
Provide transport to staff and patients to and fro the hospital when needed.
Presence of specific implementing procedural guidelines for the above general policies and procedures formulated based on the context of the hospital.

 

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