ROJoson Breast Wellness Self-assessment Tool – Part 2 – For Piloting – May 26, 2012

ROJoson Breast Wellness Self-assessment Tool – Part 2 – For Piloting – May 26, 2012

Posted on May 26, 2012 by

ROJoson Breast Wellness Self-assessment Tool – Part 2 – For Piloting – May 26, 2012

MS Word File: ROJ Breast Wellness Self_assess_Part2_rj_12may26

 

My Current Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice on Breast Wellness (Self-assessment)

Please assess each statement on the 1st  column of the table below in terms of TRUE or FALSE.

Statements on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice on Breast Wellness

True

False

  KNOWLEDGE
1 A female person is said to be in a state of breast wellness if she has no breast concerns that affect her well-being and productivity as a citizen in the community.
2 Only persons without any breast abnormality or disease can be in the state of breast wellness .
3 A patient with breast cancer can still be in a state of breast wellness.
4 Excessive or uncontrollable fear of breast cancer (breast cancerophobia) can affect the breast wellness of a female person.
5 Inadequate knowledge of normal conditions and diseases of the breasts can affect breast wellness.
6 Wrongful interpretation and understanding of what one hears and reads in discussion groups, forums, newspapers, magazines, advertisements and Internet can affect breast wellness.
7 Wrongful interpretation and understanding of what one sees and reads in the reports of diagnostic tests such as mammography , ultrasound of the breasts, and biopsy can affect breast wellness.
8 Wrongful interpretation and understanding of a physician’s explanation to a patient with a breast concern can affect breast wellness.
9 Myths (unfounded popular beliefs) on breast conditions and breast cancer can affect breast wellness.
10 All Filipino females are at risk of developing breast cancer.
11 Currently, the exact cause of breast cancer is not known.
12 Currently, there is no definite way of preventing breast cancer.
13 Currently, there is no foolproof (with 100% accuracy) way of predicting who will and who will not develop breast cancer.
14 A person with a family history of breast cancer will surely develop a breast cancer in the future.
15 A trauma or a bump on the breasts can lead to breast cancer.
16 According to the Philippines 2010 Philippine Cancer Facts and Estimates , the incidence of breast cancer starts to rise STEEPLY at age 30.
17 Breast cancers are commonly seen in the older female population.
18 At present, the most practical thing to do in the fight against breast cancer is to detect it early enough and to have it treated as soon as possible.
19 With early detection and treatment, there will be reduction in the magnitude of complications and premature deaths that are usually associated with advanced breast diseases.
20 Possessing adequate knowledge of breast conditions and diseases; performing regular breast self-examination; and seeking regular check-ups and advices from a breast specialist are currently the most practical (doable) strategies in promoting breast wellness among Filipino females.
21 A quality breast self-examination is one that is done completely, accurately, regularly, and effectively can detect breast cancer in its early stage.
22 The primary objective of palpation of the breasts, either by the female person herself or by a breast specialist, is to look for the so-called “dominant” mass, which if present, is to be considered a red flag, i.e.,one that needs further evaluation.
23 A painless “dominant” mass, particularly in female persons 30 years and older, should not be taken lightly as this has a higher risk of being cancerous than a painful “dominant” mass.
24 Breast pain without an accompanying “dominant” mass is usually not due to breast cancer.
25 Presence of redness on the surface of the breast, particularly with accompanying moderate to severe pain, is usually due to an inflammatory condition or infection of the breast.
26 A discharge from the nipple that is not red or reddish in color and that is not accompanied by a “dominant” breast mass is usually not due to breast cancer.
27 A fibrocystic breast condition or changes is due to hormonal changes and therefore, not considered a disease.
28 All diagnostic tests that can be done on the breasts, such as mammography and ultrasound, have pros (benefits and advanatages)and cons (risks and disadvantages) and therefore, must be used judiciously.
29 A breast specialist who has done physical examination of the breasts of a female person and who has made a need assessment is in the best position to determine whether a diagnostic test should be done or not and, if needed, what should be done.
30 Mammography is usually not done in female patients 30 years or younger as the breast tissues are too dense to give reliable information and results.
31 ALL results of diagnostic tests done on the breasts should be correlated (reconciled) with the physical examination findings of a breast specialist.
32 ALL diagnostic tests, such as mammography and ultrasound, and including the physical examination of the breast specialist, are 100% accurate 100% of the time.
33 Not all patients will need a diagnostic tests after an interview and a physical examination by a breast specialist.
34 If a diagnostic test is needed, the choice will be derived at after considering the benefit (advantages); risk (disadvantages); cost; and availability by both the breast specialist and the patient.
35 In deciding on treatment, the choice will be derived at after considering the benefit (advantages); risk (disadvantages); cost; and availability of procedure by both the breast specialist and the patient.
36 After treatment for a breast cancer, the choice of surveillance (follow-up) regimen and schedule will be derived at after considering the benefit (advantages); risk (disadvantages); cost; and availability of procedures by both the breast specialist and the patient.
37 It is important that there be regular follow-ups and check-ups with a breast specialist to catch breast diseases not evident at the time of previous examination; recheck initial findings; review initial evaluation; and reinforce education and coaching to promote breast wellness.
38 With the exact  cause of breast cancer not being known and with treatment directed only against the cancer, there is always a potential for recurrence after treatment.
39 After treatment for a breast cancer, recurrence can occur in any part of the body but the more common locations are in the bones and lungs.
  ATTITUDE
40 I can accept the fact that I, just like any other female Filipinos, is at risk of breast cancer during my whole lifetime.
41 I need to control my fear of breast cancer so as not to hamper my personal well-being and productivity as a citizen in the community.
42 I agree that possessing adequate knowledge of breast conditions and diseases; performing regular breast self-examination; and seeking regular check-ups and advices from a breast specialist are currently the most practical (doable) strategies in promoting breast wellness among Filipino females.
43 After doing my best to detect breast cancer early enough, I need to adopt the stance (attitude) of “hoping for the best at the same time ready to accept the worst” in order to promote my personal well-being and productivity as a citizen in the community.
44 Having breast cancer is not always a death sentence.
45 When asked, I will not be afraid to say that I have a breast cancer, in case I have it.
  PRACTICE
46 I am currently doing breast self-examination on a regular basis (monthly or at least once every 3 months).
47 I know what to look for when I do my breast self-examination.
48 I know how to recognize the so-called “dominant” mass when I do my breast self-examination.
49 I have decided on one particular breast specialist to assist me in my breast wellness program.
50 I am currently consulting my chosen breast specialist on a regular basis (such as once every 3 months or more often as needed or at least once a year).

 

 

 

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