How to cope with indigent patient incidents in government hospitals

How to cope with indigent patient incidents in government hospitals

by Reynaldo O Josonon Thursday, April 12, 2012 at 12:20am ·

City of Manila Government Hospitals – Free for Manilan and Non-Manilan Indigent Patients 

 

Mayor Alfredo Lim deserves to be commended for having established five of the six city government hospitals in Manila during his terms as Mayor.

 

He also deserves to be commended for the order to give free medical services to both Manilan and non-Manilan indigent patients.

 

See excerpts below.

 

“Manila has six hospitals now, one for each district where all medical services and medicines are free for the city’s indigents,” he (Mayor Lim) said.

 

In 1992, Manila has only one hospital, the Ospital ng Maynila, but Mayor Lim established the Ospital ng Sampaloc, Ospital ng Tondo and Gat Andres Bonifacio Hospital during his term as mayor in 1992 up to 1998.

 

To date, the city has a total of six hospitals, five of which, including Justice Jose Abad Santos Mother and Child Hospital in Binondo and Sta. Ana Hospital were established by Lim.

 

http://www.mb.com.ph/node/298456/lim-a

 

January 14, 2011

——————————————————————————————-

 

The challenge, however, particularly for the physicians, is how to cope with the “indigent patient incidents” being frequently encountered when the stocks of medicines and supplies run out or are not available. The Hospital Administration and the entire physician workforce from all the clinical medical departments, no doubt have always tried their very best to manage the “indigent patient incidents” by assisting the indigent patients in securing the needed medicines, supplies, equipments and diagnostic tests to be done from various sources.  They should be commended for their compassion and resourcefulness.

 

There are two questions or issues, however, that should be asked or explored:

1.      How do the hospital administration and the entire physician workforce manage the “indigent patient incidents” when the stocks of medicines and supplies run out or are not available?

2.      How successful are they in managing the “indigent patient incidents” in terms of indigent patients not being deprived of proper treatment and no delay in treatment?

 

I am interested to know the answers to the above two questions.

 

The “indigent patient incidents” are encountered in all government hospitals.  All hospital directors of government hospitals should be prepared to manage these incidents.

 

What are the strategies? I invite inputs from hospital directors, particularly of government hospitals.

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