Fibroadenoma in Male Breasts – Very Rare and Very Unlikely

Fibroadenoma in Male Breasts – Very Rare and Very Unlikely

Last January 17, 2012, a surgical resident made a postoperative diagnosis of fibroadenoma after operating on a male patient with a breast concern.  I commented that in my entire 30 years of practice, I have not made a diagnosis of fibroadenoma in a male patient nor have I received a histopathologic report of fibroadenoma in  a male patient.  I asked somebody to look up this problem-based learning issue for verification.   A resident reported and supported my comment.

Fibroadenomas usually develop from lobules of the breast.  Since male breasts usually don’t have lobules, we don’t expect to see fibroadenomas in males.   If there are, they are extremely extremely rare.  So, my advice is to be very very careful to make a diagnosis of a fibroadenoma in a male.  Chances are, you will be questioned and you are wrong.

Leonard M. Glassman said something to this effect:

Fibroepithelial lesions are extremely rare because they start in the lobules.
So do not diagnose a fibroadenoma in a man, even if it looks like a fibroadenoma.
When you get a biopsy result that says fibroadenoma, get another pathologist.

http://www.radiologyassistant.nl/en/49a3cce262026

References:

  1. Robbins and Cotran. Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease. 8th Ed. 2010
  2. Rosai and Ackerman. Surgical Pathology. 9th Ed. 2004
  3. Glassman, Leonard. Male Breast. The Radiology Assistant. 2009


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2 Responses to Fibroadenoma in Male Breasts – Very Rare and Very Unlikely

  1. Pingback: PBLI – Fibroadenoma in Male Breasts – Very Rare and Very Unlikely | Problem-based Learning in Surgery

  2. rojoson says:

    Feedback from John the Surgical Resident [January 30, 2012): Yes sir. I also was able to read the literatures regarding fibroadenomas in males. The histopathological report of my patient was gynecomastia. And so, from now on, whenever there is a consult of a male breast mass, my considerations will be gynecomastia versus malignancy.

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